New minimum wage rates took effect on Saturday, July 1st in cities, counties and states across the country.

In San Francisco and Los Angeles, the increase is a step toward a minimum wage of $15 an hour.

The minimum wage went up to $14 an hour in San Francisco on Saturday, on the way to $15 next year. In Los Angeles, city and county, the minimum wage rises to between $10.50 and $12, depending on the size of the business. It will hit $15 for all businesses in 2021.

Other parts of the country have approved more bumps. Maryland raised the minimum wage from $8.75 to $9.25 last weekend, then up to $10.10 next year.

The federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. Congress hasn’t raised it in 10 years.

Minimum wage was raised in the following cities as of July 1, 2017:

  • Chicago, Illinois: $11 an hour.

  • Cook County, Illinois: $10 an hour.

  • Emeryville, California: $15.20 an hour for businesses with more than 56 employees, and $14 an hour for businesses with 55 or fewer employees.

  • Flagstaff, Arizona: $10.50 an hour.

  • Los Angeles city and county: $12 an hour for businesses with more than 26 employees, and $10.50 an hour for businesses with 25 or fewer employees.

  • Maryland: $9.25 an hour.

  • Milpitas, California: $11 an hour.

  • Montgomery County, Maryland: $11.50 an hour.

  • Oregon: $10.25 an hour. (Exception: $11.25 an hour in the Portland metro area, and $10 an hour in some counties designated as “non-urban.”)

  • Pasadena, California: $12 an hour for businesses with 26 or more employees, and $10.50 an hour or businesses with 25 or fewer employees.

  • San Francisco, California: $14 an hour.

  • San Jose, California: $12 an hour.

  • San Leandro, California: $12 an hour.

  • Santa Monica, California: $12 an hour for businesses with 26 or more employees, and $10.50 an hour or businesses with 25 or fewer employees.

  • Washington, D.C.: $12.50 an hour.

 

NEXT STEPS:

  • Be sure to post up-to-date required minimum wage posters for all locations.

  • Adjust pay rates for employees making minimum wage as of July 1, 2017.

Sources: Employment Policies Institute, National Employment Law Project, National Conference for State Legislatures and Business for a Fair Minimum Wage.